2014 Education Summit

Our 2014 Education Summit was a huge success and we had some very special guests.

“The summit, held by the Catholic Partnership Schools, a non-profit foundation operating the five Catholic schools in Camden, gathered 323 education professionals for a day of panel discussions and networking.” Read more at Philly.com

A premier gathering of academics, educators, school psychologists, social workers, early education specialists and others for a daylong exploration of the long-term psychological and neurological impact of poverty and trauma on children’s ability to learn.

 

2014 2nd Education Summit

 

Continuing the Conversation…

Self-Control, Poverty, Social and Emotional Development, and the Roles They Play in Raising our Children

The Enterprise Center

Burlington County College, Mt. Laurel, New Jersey

Monday, March 24, 2014

Keynote:

Angela Duckworth

Angela Duckworth, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Duckworth is a 2013 recipient of the prestigious MacArthur Fellow Genius Award. She is identified throughout the country for advancing our understanding of how self-control and grit — the relentless work ethic of sustaining your commitments toward a long-term goal — impact success. The implications of her work span from education to employment to human happiness.

 

Panelists:

Maurice J. Elias, PhD, Professor, Department of Psychology, Director of Social-Emotional Learning Lab, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

Dr. Elias has spent his professional lifetime focusing on action-research, clinical work, and policy/advocacy to develop positive, constructive life paths for children and youth. He is a well-respected expert in social-emotional learning (SEL), character education, primary prevention, school-based intervention, evidence-based intervention, and socialization of identity..

Hallam Hurt, MD, Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine and Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Dr. Hurt spent over 25 years studying the impact of cocaine on child development. Her recently published research determined that the most dangerous consequences for babies and their home environments are not from crack itself but from the environment created from poverty. The families have few resources, have work and family problems, and have limited parenting skills.

Douglas MacIver, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Social Organization of Schools, School of Education, Johns Hopkins University

For almost 30 years, Dr. MacIver has been studying how to change curriculum and instructional programs; professional development, and teacher and student support systems. His objective is to make them more effective in promoting teacher and student learning, academic achievement, student engagement and continuing motivation. As a developmental psychologist, his research directly helps middle schools in high poverty neighborhoods.

Matt Katz, Moderator, WNYC, New York Public Radio

In 2009, his four-part investigation about Camden set the stage for an end to the state’s takeover of city government. He has covered New Jersey since 2000. Matt Katz has covered New Jersey Governor Chris Christie for more than three years, first for The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he created The Christie Chronicles blog, and now for WNYC and New Jersey Public Radio, member stations of NPR. Mr. Katz has written for The New Republic, The Washington Post, and POLITICO magazine. Prior to moving to the Statehouse in Trenton, he spent time in Afghanistan, writing a series on reconstruction efforts that won the Livingston Award for International Reporting for journalists under the age of 35.

 

Summit Overview

One day gathering of researchers, social scientists, educators, teachers, administrators, and parents coming together to shape a program of action that springs from a greater understanding of the physiological and neurological impact of poverty, violence, and trauma on a student’s ability to learn and succeed. After the keynote address, presentations by the panel members, and audience Q&A, smaller expert/practitioner groups will explore in facilitated working groups more effective strategies for improving behavior, resilience, academic achievement, and parental engagement. The summit will be the jumping off point for additional conversation and networking that will ultimately lead to new and practicable solutions. The post-conference blog will be a platform for exchange of ideas, research, and the sharing of strategies and practices that work.

Focus of General and Concurrent Sessions

  • Turning theory into practice with what we know now. Research is great but how does one use it to inform daily practice?
  • What are doable interventions that have been shown to reverse the negative impact of violence and poverty and get children on the right academic path?
  • How can mindfulness strategies and practice create a safe and emotionally healing space for learning?
  • What is the role of parents?

Attendees will gain valuable information about:

  • The long-term impact on memory, executive function, and motivation from negative emotions and sustained stress in children;
  • The effects of trauma, poverty, and anxiety on a child and the resulting behaviors in the classroom and on the playground;
  • The latest best practices for improving literacy, behavior, and whole child outcomes;
  • Role of parents in mitigating the effects of social and emotional stressors in their child’s life.

The Summit Schedule will be:

8:00 a.m. Registration/Breakfast

8:45 a.m. Welcome & Overview

9:00 a.m. Keynote Address –Angela Duckworth, PhD

10:00 a.m. Break

10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion

11:30 a.m. Q & A

12:15 p.m. Lunch

1:15 – 2:15 p.m. Concurrent Session A

  • A-1 (For Ages Pre-K to 5th Grade) “Social and Emotional Learning: How to create Safe and Caring Learning Environments in the Classroom”  – Lauren  Hyman Kaplan, MA, Social-Emotional Specialist and Counselor
  • A-2 “Exploring the Effects of Gestational Cocaine on Child Outcome: A Cautionary Tale” – Hallam Hurt, MD, Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine and Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
  • A-3“Incorporating Mindfulness-based Strategies into the Classroom: Using Brain Breaks, 5-minute Mini-lessons, and Calm Transitions to Reduce Stress in the Teaching and Learning Environment” – Jenny Roca Mills, MEd, Director of Development for Educational Programming at the PENN Program for Mindfulness; Founder, Roots and Wings, LLC
  • A-4 “Putting all Students on the Path to Graduation and College Readiness: Early Warning and Response Systems That Provide the Right Students with the Right Supports at the Right Times” – Douglas MacIver, PhD, Co-Director, Center for Social Organization of Schools, School of Education, Johns Hopkins University

2:15-2:30 p.m. Break

2:30 – 3:30 p.m. Concurrent Session B

  • B-1 (For Ages 6th Grade through 12th Grade) “Social and Emotional Learning: How to Create Safe and Caring Learning Environments in the Classroom” – Lauren Hyman Kaplan, MA
  • B-2 “Exploring the Effects of Gestational Cocaine on Child Outcomes: A Cautionary Tale” – Hallam Hurt, MD
  • B-3 “Incorporating Mindfulness-based Strategies into the Classroom: Using Brain Breaks, 5-minute Mini-lessons, and Calm Transitions to Reduce Stress in the Teaching and Learning Environment” – Jenny Roca Mills, MEd
  • B-4 “Putting all Students on the Path to Graduation and College Readiness: Early Warning and Response Systems That Provide the Right Students with the Right Supports at the Right Times” – Douglas MacIver, PhD

For additional information about the conference contact:

Sister Karen Dietrich, SSJ, PhD, Executive Director, 856-338-0966, kdietrich@cspschools.org

Keith A. Lampman, Director of Development, 856-338-0966, kalampman@cspschools.org

 


Notes From Last Year’s Summit…

2013 Education Summit


 

It’s Unanimous. The 2013 Education Summit Was a Winner

Our thanks to the more than 300 education professionals from seven states who converged on The Enterprise Center in Mt. Laurel, NJ on Monday, March 18th to hear noted author Paul Tough and a high-powered panel of researchers and academics talk about the power of resilience and grit and the need for a deeper understanding of the social and emotional underpinnings of success in childhood and beyond.

What set the conference apart was the sheer diversity of the group. Representatives from every sector serving children were there – from pre-school specialists to university researchers, professors, and students; charter, district, parochial, and private schools administrators and teachers; guidance counselors; educational psychologists; social workers; funders; parents, and government officials. They came together to learn more about the latest research on the physiological and neurological impact of poverty and trauma on young lives, to share ideas and resources,  and to reinforce for one another the need to first help children deal with the daunting challenges they face every day.

After the keynote address, presentations by the panel members, and audience Q&A, smaller groups met in 8 facilitated workshops led by the presenters to learn more effective classroom and school-based strategies for improving behavior, resilience, academic achievement, and parental engagement. For more about the speakers, click here.

Attendees came away armed with strategies for turning developmental theory into meaningful practice.  They heard about the practical interventions that have been shown to reverse the negative impact of violence and poverty and get children on the right academic path.

They learned how mindfulness strategies and practice create a safe and emotionally healing space for learning. And they discussed the critical role of parents at home and in school in ensuring positive student outcomes.

 

To read the story in the Philadelphia Inquirer  http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/20130319_N_J__summit_looks_at_effects_of_stress_on_learning.html

And in Camden’s Catholic Star Herald

http://www.catholicstarherald.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=7638:summit-examines-impact-of-poverty-and-violence-&catid=95:catholic-school-news

 

Just a few of the impressions from the Summit:

I was not only impressed but moved by the commitment of Catholic Partnership Schools to the children of Camden. The Summit was both thought provoking and inspiring.
Rob Kutzik ,
Educational Consultant

Thank you so much for an outstanding seminar.  It’s so rare and exhilarating to go back to my classroom and feel like I have something I can’t wait to try with my students tomorrow.  I’m sorry I didn’t get a chance to say a proper goodbye, but I wanted to let you know how much I appreciated being a part of this dynamic day.  Thank you for all of your hard work, and to your marvelous team for making this possible.  Great job and deep gratitude for inspiring 300 educators today!
Jodi Sabra
, Radnor Middle School, Language Artist, 6B

What an amazing day of learning from the researchers!  Thank you for your initiative in hosting such an event!  From an outsider’s perspective, it was well organized.  We host annual educators’ conferences in Virginia, so understand the preparation that goes into such an event!
Wanda Parks
, MEd. Admin., P.C.E.T., Virginia State Director, NILD Certified Educational Therapist

I loved the summit.  It was so incredible- the speakers, the huge attendance, the ever-so important topic. We need to do this more often.  Your kids are amazing!
Cindy Quinton
, Founder & Executive Director, Shared Ground at Domenica Farm

As a team,  we truly can’t begin to share how much we took away from the summit. It was a wonderful experience full of deep insights and collaboration.  I have worked the past 3 years with first and second year teachers in Camden through Teach For America and the take-aways from Monday will be very beneficial in my work with our corps members. My team was truly inspired by the way your schools are thinking holistically about student needs and the communities in which they live.
Morgan Craig
, Director, Teacher Leadership Development, Teach For America- Greater Philadelphia